Weekly Tech Roundup | Feb 22, 2019

Weekly tech roundup: photonics technology special edition

This week’s tech roundup includes just a few of the latest photonics technologies available at the moment. All of them are opportunities for entrepreneurs and businesses to license and bring to the commercial market.

Get your free bonus download: Guide to Technology Transfer: Why and How to License Technology from Federal Laboratories

Here is this week’s photonics technology roundup:

On-chip photon generator

Using a ring resonator–type design, Air Force scientists have developed a microdevice for optical integrated on-chip generation of photon pairs as a building block to create the entangled photon states required for quantum computing.

The device can be used to generate photon pairs, entangled states, larger entangled states, and higher squeezed states (for continuous variable applications).

Click to learn more about this photonics technology:

View Technology Summary

Reducing speckles in infrared laser micro and stand-off spectroscopy

Navy scientists have developed a device and process for reducing the coherence of laser light without significant loss of power. With this technology, laser light that is highly coherent is converted into a less-coherent but still bright light that is suitable for illumination in microscopes and other devices yielding an improvement in image quality.

Uses for this technology include enhanced, laser-based detection of explosives on surfaces and better control of tunable quantum cascade laser beam parameters for stand-off detection. In fact, all high-resolution IR imaging techniques that require high-brightness sources for illumination would benefit.

Click to learn more about this photonics technology:

View Technology Summary

Surface adhesion improvement via pulsed laser nanostructuring

Patterning the surface of a material can significantly improve its mechanical, chemical, or electro-optical qualities.

Navy scientists have developed a patterning process with precision control and which does not require hazardous chemicals. The method is ideally suited to imparting a pattern for adhesion purposes.

Click to learn more about this photonics technology:

View Technology Summary

Fiber laser collimating for directed energy systems

Army researchers have developed a fiber laser collimator and an array of seven collimators configured to transmit approximately 100% of full power from the fiber tip despite the restricted output lens aperture. In this collimator and array, the truncated beam tails with parasitic radiation are not intercepted and dissipated within the array, but instead, are re-directed into the output lenslet.

The high compactness and small weight of the collimator allows one to develop a portable array of densely packed collimators with the maximum efficiency of coherent beam combining (CBC) on the remote target or receiver for directed energy applications, free-space optical communication, and laser machining.

Click to learn more about this photonics technology:

View Technology Summary

Suspended waveguides for frequency conversion

Navy scientists have developed a birefringent phase matching (BPM) optical semiconductor device from nanomachined type III-V semiconductor materials configured to produce low loss.

This integrated non-linear device is useful for frequency conversion, particularly for generating optical pulses at wavelengths that are not readily generated by presently available laser devices.

Click to learn more about this photonics technology:

View Technology Summary

Automated optimization and restoration for underwater images

The visual range underwater is limited to, at best, tens of meters, even in the clearest waters. To improve the underwater optical environment, Navy researchers have developed the image quality metric (IQM) which is based on a weighted grayscale angle (WGSA) – a measure of the overall sharpness of edges in the image.

While developed by the Navy for better imaging in seawater, the technology and method can be applied to any type of imaging in a medium that may have optical properties relating to scattering or attenuation, such as imaging in foggy, smoggy, or smoky conditions. It could also be applied in medical imaging, where the image may be affected by biological scattering media such as blood and tissues.

Click to learn more about this photonics technology:

View Technology Summary

Headshot Image of Austin Leach, PhD, CLP

Is your business interested in one of these hot technologies?

Contact Us