Weekly Tech Roundup | Mar 29, 2019

Weekly tech roundup: military technology edition

U.S. Army photo by Sgt Philip Ribas

This week’s tech roundup includes some of the latest, advanced military technologies available at the moment. All of them are opportunities for entrepreneurs and businesses to license, develop, and bring to the military market.

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If none of these featured inventions interest you, we have many more to browse. Click through to our full list of military technology.

Gas mask with improved filter connection

Gas masks and respirators contain filters that must be periodically changed. Ideally, this could be done while the wearer remains in a contaminated or potentially contaminated environment. But in real-world situations, the practice of switching filters can and often does allow for contaminants to pass to the wearer of the mask. With some toxins, it can take only a few seconds to inhale a debilitating or lethal dose.

The Army has developed a new gas mask and filter design that reduces the potential for the inhalation of contaminants during a filter swap.

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Radar video data viewing system

For performance testing and training, radar video data needs to be obtained from a Harpoon missile seeker in a graphical form which depicts radar scans and accessible using currently available standard office software.

Navy engineers have developed highly effective computer software for plotting multiple scans of radar video data on a chart as well as detection gate information for each scan of radar video data appearing on the chart.

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Pressure activated safe/arming device for air-dropped munitions

As used in explosive devices, the primary purpose of a safe and arm (S&A) device is to prevent accidental functioning of the main charge of explosive in a fuze prior to arming.

Navy scientists have now developed an S&A device wherein arming is indirectly affected by the pressure differential. This launch sensing, fluid pressure activated S&A device for a fuze in a bomb functions explosively when the proper target environment is provided.

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Improved safety bomb casing

Insensitive munitions have become very important in national defense technology. Many weapons developed in the past did not take into account all of the severe environments that a weapon may encounter during its lifecycle. These environments may include excessive heat or impact with bullets and fragments, and so forth.

To improve the safety of insensitive munitions, Navy scientists and engineers have devised a venting system for the base plug of the ordnance. This unique safety feature is designed to prevent tampering and to resist electromagnetic radiation and electrostatic discharge. It will even provide sealing when the ordnance is exposed to high external pressures.

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Safer, more environmentally friendly smoke screens

Conventional, obscurant smoke formulations contain hexachloroethane (HX), zinc oxide, and aluminum. This pyrotechnic reaction produces a large volume of zinc chloride, which is a toxic substance.

Army scientists have developed a pyrotechnic formulation to generate a smoke screen for obscuring effects and for ground-to-air signaling which provides excellent smoke effects while producing less toxic products than conventional formulations.

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Optical bomb detection device

The elimination of unexploded ordnance (UXO) on land presents a serious problem for both military and civilian personnel. The basic operation of removing or disposing of the UXO includes detection, assessment, and disposal. The task of detecting UXO is painstaking and dangerous, requiring a thorough canvassing of the area. Detecting and locating UXO needs to be safe and economical.

Navy scientists have developed an optical sensing device to detect UXO.

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Headshot Image of Austin Leach, PhD, CLP

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