Weekly Tech Roundup | May 24, 2019

Weekly tech roundup: battery technology edition

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This week’s tech roundup features battery technologies that are available to license, develop, and launch into the battery industry.

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Smart battery charger

The rechargeable lithium battery market was approximately $9.4 billion in 2015 and is projected to grow to more than $11.9 billion by 2020.

Navy researchers have invented a novel multiple-battery charging device that uses a common source and is capable of handling different battery sizes. The system incorporates a power controller with a programmable algorithm which controls the power reduction and battery charging process.

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Li-ion battery cathodes

Lithium-Ion (Li-ion) batteries are widely used because of their high-specific energy, high-energy density, and excellent charge retention. Many Li-ion batteries use a manganese dioxide cathode which has high-energy density and low material cost.

Army researchers have improved lithium manganese materials with a new compound.

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Solid electrolyte rechargeable lithium battery

The Air Force has developed a new class of solid-state electrolyte for secondary lithium batteries.

The new technology eliminates safety concerns posed by liquid electrolyte lithium cells. The batteries do not contain corrosive liquids and eliminate combustion due to overheating conditions.

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Lithium-Ion battery state-of-health monitor

The Navy has developed a diagnostic tool that tests entire battery packs to determine in real-time if a cell within the pack has suffered damage. This eliminates the need to individually test each cell separately.

The single-point diagnostic technology can operate as a stand-alone diagnostic or in real-time as part of an online monitoring system.

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Simulated battery and test device

Li-ion batteries can become fire risks when operated at higher temperatures (above 60°C).

To address safety concerns, Navy researchers have developed a simulation battery. The test device safely replicates the thermal qualities of a battery and can be used to evaluate cooling methods.

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Lithium bromide battery holder

Navy scientists and engineers have developed a battery compartment insert to eliminate the need to use expensive battery packs, allowing for easy insertion and quick replacement of transponder batteries.

The system saves up to $125 every time transponder batteries need to be changed.

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Headshot Image of Austin Leach, PhD, CLP

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