Weekly Tech Roundup | Apr 11, 2019

Weekly tech roundup: energy technology edition

This week’s tech roundup includes a handful of the latest energy technologies available at the moment. Each of them is an opportunity for entrepreneurs and businesses to license, develop, and bring cutting-edge technology to the commercial market.

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If none of these featured inventions interest you, browse all of the available energy technologies.

Scroll down for the full roundup:

Imprinting surfaces with carbon nanotubes for solar cell applications

Navy scientists have developed a process to imprint films with nanoparticles. The process may have application for the further development of organic solar cells as it can yield nano-structured electron and hole collecting interfaces.

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Harvesting electrical energy from a data bus

The Navy has prototyped a technology that covertly harvests energy from the signals sent through a data bus on an electronics circuit.

In operation, a switching circuit connects between two network nodes of a data bus and under predetermined rules, the system selectively redirects the signal to the second subsystem, the energy harvester. The system harvests the whole signal for a very short amount of time, introducing errors on the packet level, which are corrected through redundancy, retransmission or some type of error-correcting scheme already designed into the data bus.

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Environmentally safe bipropellant fuel system decreases handling complexity

If launching rockets is your business, you’ll want to take notice of the Air Force’s new bipropellant fuel system. It’s truly clean and green, and it moves the needle on performance.

The high energy density in the Air Force's new hypergolic bipropellant system has the potential to replace bipropellants currently used in on-orbit spacecraft propulsion. Other applications may include liquid engines for boost and divert propulsion and commercial applications like satellite deployment and space launch activities.

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Pan & tilt mount for a solar reflector

In order to lower costs and increase the efficiency of solar concentration installations, Navy scientists have devised a T-shaped torque coupler support for the mounting of reflectors and mirrors.

With this design, the mirrors or other reflectors may be turned to any angle to track the rays of the sun. Further, the fragile mirrors may be completely flipped over in the case of hailstorms, in order to avoid destruction.

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Metal borohydride tablets for on-demand hydrogen generation

The Navy has invented a novel way to create hydrogen using a three-ingredient tablet. Their method to store and generate hydrogen minimizes any excess solution volume or chemical handling.

The method represents an alternative approach to generating hydrogen using green chemistry.

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Headshot Image of Austin Leach, PhD, CLP

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